Gundam: Mercury Witch channels its anti-capitalist undertones into a single, incredible punch

Gundam: Mercury Witch channels its anti-capitalist undertones into a single, incredible punch

Image for an article titled Gundam: The Witch of Mercury channeled its anti-capitalist subtext into a single, incredible punch

Screenshot: Crunchyroll

Yippee Mobile Suit Gundam: Witch of Mercury about the pursuit of personal revenge through medium of giant robots? Yes. Are the gender dynamics of space exploration defined by the economy over the environment? Yes. It is? about space lesbians? Maybe yes. But right now it’s also about an anti-capitalist queen beating the soul right out of rich jerks.

Image for an article titled Gundam: The Witch of Mercury channeled its anti-capitalist subtext into a single, incredible punch

This week’s episode Witch of Mercury“Invisible trap,” he peels off a bit Utena-esque dueling politics at its fancy school for machine-piloting corporate scions (the weird vibes between Suletta and her newly acquired fiancé Miorin, blessedly, remain) to shine a light on the world for which the Asticassia School of Technology prepares its students. in a way we haven’t really seen on the show yet.

Image for an article titled Gundam: The Witch of Mercury channeled its anti-capitalist subtext into a single, incredible punch

Screenshot: Crunchyroll

It’s not due to Mobile Suit combat, as it has been in the series so far, but largely due to the conflict between “Earthians” – natives of humanity’s homeworld – and “Spacians” – people born and living in humanity’s nascent space colonies. Although it was there in shades (much of Sulette’s antagonism from her classmates is due to the fact that someone from Mercury, home to a small group of miners extracting rare resources in dangerous, grueling conditions, is perceived as a “scumbag”), “The Unseen Trap ” it does so much more explicitly both on the macro level of the world beyond Asticassia and on the micro level of the divide between haves and have-nots students.

We first see this at the school, where during a student training trial in Asticassia’s “Demi-Trainer” suits, Chuatury Panlunch (one of Sulleta’s few potential allies at the school) fails when her mechanic’s camera is sabotaged by a time-delay spray. Known affectionately (despite her gruff attitude) as Chuchu, Chuatury is revealed to be the leader of Asticassia’s Earth House, one of the many factions among the school’s students, which are otherwise dominated by groups formed around the companies they fund and controlschool and descendants of these companies. When Suletta, herself a Spaniard—ostracized by her classmates after her surprising defeat of top duelist Guel Jeturk not once, but twice – she comes to Earth House in search of teammates to help her participate in your own pilot test, we learn that Chuchu’s fierce antagonism towards the Spacians is due at how she and the other Earthlings in society look down on her.

Image for an article titled Gundam: The Witch of Mercury channeled its anti-capitalist subtext into a single, incredible punch

Screenshot: Crunchyroll

Chuchu and the other Earthlings are treated by the Spacians, who have turned the solar system into an economic powerhouse, as a disposable workforce, unworthy of inheriting the lavish efforts of space colonization, efforts undertaken solely for the sake of Earthly work. We see this at the Earth House in Asticassia, where Earth students are given a dilapidated hangar to repair their suits.and live inrather than lavish surroundings where we briefly see the other students. We see it in the news that flashes on their television showing mobile suits from some of the most powerful companies in the Benerit Group that controls Asticassia engaging in a violent crackdown on land workers who are protesting labor abuses committed in the name of Spanish capital.

Dividing this great sociopolitical conflict into Earth vs. Colony is nothing foreign Gundam-that’s long been a major theme of the franchise—but making it explicitly about the evils of capitalism and a layer of class conflict beyond that is something the franchise has otherwise left on the thematic sidelines, rather than being textually explicit like we see here.

It all comes togetherin the most brutal act of violence in Witch of Mercury yet. When the same Spacians who sabotaged Chuchu’s Demi-Trainer use the same trick Suletta during their review – no because Suletta is just a “bumpkin” from Mercury, but because she chooses to associate with an Earth house – Chuchu watches furiously as Suletta slowly collapses, trying to break through her blinding suit before sobbing her heart out to Miorine over her communicators. Chuchu notices that the two girls are watching their prank from afar and giggles with glee, jumping out of his own demi-trainer and running over to them and, well…

His brutal. Just the girl’s body it will faillike she got a mental Blue Screen death from a single blow. The fight between Chuchu and the other girl is equally brutal, catching Suletta in the crossfire with a terrible blow and eventually leading to Chuchu and Suletta joining together. but also in that they both need to retake their pilot tests.

Ithat’s unbelievable a series that has given us some excellent, powerful action scenes so far – ones that extrapolate the violence inflicted on the humanoid forms of his mecha to its larger themes of abuse, or, like in this same episode, the horror of seeing those mechs turned against humans. goals — is able to show off the most brutal action yet a single blow, from one young girl to another, an echo fury Witch of Mercurygreater class conflict.


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